I Believe in Jesus: Leading Your Child to Christ

A Book Review by Wendy

27779102When first opening this book, written by John MacArthur, I was immediately struck by the beautiful illustrations and colors.  As the parent of a younger child, it can be difficult to hold their attention if there are more than just a couple lines of text per page, but the beautiful illustrations really capture her focus.  The book is a little mature for children of her age, being aimed at more at age eight and up, but so is the message.  We don’t expect the little ones to be able to make a declaration for Christ.

The message of the book is a walk through the Gospel.  It starts with the creation account and the fall of man.  It tries to describe sin in a way that makes sense to children, without compromising in the language.  In the book it describes sin as when we do something bad, but it doesn’t shy away from the term sin.  It then leads us through God’s design for forgiveness, and the birth and role of Jesus Christ for forgiveness.  It explains about how the punishment for sin is fulfilled through the sacrifice and resurrection for Jesus Christ.

Next, the book walks through the prayer of salvation, listing out exactly what the prayer means before presenting the outline for the prayer.  If I had one criticism of the book, it would be the absence of repentance.  The author did such a good job explaining sin and forgiveness, but failed to include repentance in the prayer for salvation.  It’s a big concept for children, but if we want their prayer to be genuine, it should be complete.

The author finishes after the book with explaining their new relationship to God through the Holy Spirit, and commissioning them to share the story, the book, and the prayer with their friends.

I thought this book was a nice addition to a child’s education on God’s Word.  I think it should be included in the Sunday school program.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

NKJV Teen Study Bible

A Book Review by Wendy

NKJV Teen Study Bible.cover

This is a nice, hardcover edition of this book, and my first look through the text is a positive one.  I like the common language explanations found throughout the text that make the content relevant to a younger reader.  I also really like the full color maps found in the back of the Bible, that bring the Biblical world to life in a clear, easy to understand manner.

There is a full-layout section that covers the apostle’s creed in detail, but that content is only relevant to some branches of Christianity.  As a Baptist, it doesn’t seem particularly necessary, but useful for understanding key doctrinal statements that pertain to all Christians.  It’s a little concerning that it’s included since it isn’t original to the Biblical texts, but it doesn’t distract from the truth of the Word.

This Bible also includes a keyword index, highlighting terms deemed relevant to today’s teens.  Words like abortion, war, environment, and evolution lead young people to areas of the Bible that address these topics.

There are also sample letters scattered throughout the book which address concerns that most teens face today.  For example, one teen considers the church service boring and is looking for ways to find the church more engaging.  The response is one that simplifies the church service to activities.  These Dear Jordan letters are supposed to provide perspective to young readers attempting to study the Bible on their own, or look for enlightenment.

While this is a great resource for studying God’s Word, it has a couple of drawbacks that I was surprised by.  The first is that the explanations are written for a lower reading level, simplifying the concepts of the Bible beyond a point where I feel they are needed to be considering the text is designed for teenagers.  It also lacks a verse by verse commentary that I find useful in the study Bibles I use, and I find that it’s absence in this case is again simplifying the Bible beyond what teenagers can handle.  With these two considerations, I could see using this Bible for a new believer within this age group, but not one with more experience within Bible study.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”